My first post about classroom organization seemed pretty popular, so I wanted to write another post about how I organize classroom supplies. Since I teach secondary English, occasionally I have students create projects that require them to cut, glue, draw, and color. And because of this, I need to have scissors, glue sticks, rulers, colored pencils, markers, and crayons in my classroom. I keep them organized in clear plastic shoe boxes. These shoeboxes provide many benefits: they stack nicely, they are durable, and you can see their contents. I also use similar boxes to organize my son's playroom. I purchased these shoeboxes more than four years ago and they are still working great. I don't think I will need to replace them for quite some time. I have a built-in shelving system in my classroom. My white boards actually slide on this system and hide the contents within. All of the shoeboxes with the classroom supplies fit inside. The shoeboxes keep all of the supplie...
I've got crayons. I've got hundreds and hundreds of crayons, and I got them all for free! Now you might be asking yourself, "why does a secondary English teacher need so many crayons?" Truth be told, the answer is simple. I need them because they are a great tool for teaching writing. I use my tubs and tubs of crayons almost every single month when I have my students write essays. Since I teach a lot of EL students and struggling writers, I use crayons as a part of my instruction, and I teach my students how to color code their essay. As students brainstorm for and outline their essay, each body paragraph is assigned a color. Once they formulate their topic sentences, my students then underline each topic sentence in that same color. From there, I instruct my students to  underline each portion of their thesis in the correct, corresponding color. Color-coding essays helps students learn essay structure and organization. They understand organization so much m...
As educators, we must always remain cognizant of the fact that students do not all learn the same way. Different strategies and different instructional practices reach students differently. I feel that this is especially true when working with EL students and students with special needs. That is why I try to incorporate as many different strategies as possible, and this one is one really gets the students working together and using their higher level thinking skills. Join my email list! Subscribe to receive updates from The Daring English Teacher. Thank you for subscribing! You will soon receive updates, freebies, and teaching ideas. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again. Email Address I'd like to receive the free email course. Subscribe You will not receive spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit I recently had my journalism students complete this activity in class,...
Hi, and welcome to my blog. This is a great time to begin an educational blog because it is a new year, and the new semester starts tomorrow morning. I am really excited to gear back up and get back in the classroom. Seeing as how it is a brand new year, I have a couple ideas in mind for starting off on the right foot. In the very beginning of the school year I did a great ice breaker activity with all of my classes. It was a Post Secret themed activity, and it really worked. So many of my students opened up and shared some pretty deep secrets anonymously. I shared the secrets aloud, and by the end of the class period my students knew that they were not alone. Many had the same secrets, the same fears, the same hopes, the same doubts. I plan on having my students participate in another activity tomorrow that will hopefully open up their eyes. The Crumpled Paper Experiment In the beginning of class I will ask all of my students to get out a piece of paper. Then, I will instruct t...