Classroom management is something that many teachers struggle with, especially as budget cuts pack more and more students into classrooms. Some secondary classrooms across the nation have as many as 40 or more students in their classes. This not only makes teaching the content difficult, but it also makes classroom management and individual student contact more difficult as well.  This post is now part of a link-up. Click  HERE  to see related classroom management posts.  One particular area of concern is maximizing instructional time. In an ideal world, class starts the very second the bell rings with a classroom filled with attentive students who are ready to learn. In a real world setting, this is often times not the case. Depending on school tardy policies, many teachers may struggle with stragglers coming into their classrooms at the very last minute. And then there are the students who need to sharpen their pencils after the bell rings, the ones who come in after ...
It’s that time of year again. High school English teachers are breaking out the Shakespeare and introducing their freshmen to the classic tragedy of Romeo and Juliet. When I first started teaching, Shakespeare intimidated me. Sure I read it in high school and again in college, but now I was expected to be an expert in it. I would read ahead every night, annotate my teacher’s edition textbook, and prepare for the next day’s reading. Eventually the fear of teaching Shakespeare diminished completely. I now look forward to this unit every year. I’m pretty sure that my students experience a similar wave of emotions: at first they are unsure of themselves and intimidated by the Elizabethan language, but by the middle of the play, they are pros. So how exactly do I teach Shakespeare? First, I begin by introducing William Shakespeare and Elizabethan language. To demonstrate how language changes overtime, I give them examples of phrases my grandparents used to say: gee whiz,...
As teachers, we tend to have a difficult time making sacrifices in the classroom. For many of us, especially those of us who teach in low socio-economic areas, we might be one of the only constants in our students’ lives. We want to make sure that we are always “on” for our students. At times this can be a challenge, and it only gets more challenging when you are pregnant. However, there are ways to survive teaching while pregnant without sacrificing anything in your classroom. The first trimester can be a difficult one to navigate, especially if you are experiencing difficult morning sickness. I was fortunate enough to have mostly afternoon sickness, but I was queasy all day long. Many women also prefer to not share any pregnancy news with family, friends, coworkers, and bosses during this time as well, which can only make these 13 weeks more complicated. Hiding morning sickness and frequent restroom trips from students and fellow staffers can be challenging. Here i...