Here at the Literary League, we’re a group of English teachers who truly love literature (we bet you already figured that part out). Given free time, we can all agree that there’s nothing better than leaping into a good book. But, even as avid readers, we have to admit that those spare minutes tend to be few and far between, especially during the school year, and there are times that we just have to … leap into a book recommended by a friend, a colleague, or especially a student, who is anxiously awaiting our review leap into a new novel we’re teaching, whether or not we’ve had time to fully prepare a complete unit leap into a classic, maybe not one of our favorites, but something we know students need to sit with in order to grow as a reader For those instances, the Literary League is teaming up to share some of our favorite resources to help you Leap into Literature. These are resources that are not tied to a particular book, but ones that can be used over and over again,...
This is the first blog post in a series of posts about creating and establishing a growth mindset in the classroom.    Creating a Growth Mindset in your Secondary Classroom Many schools across the nation are adopting a growth mindset approach to education. Schools and classrooms that embrace a growth mindset see the value in learning as a process, and strive to help students put forth their best effort. So, what exactly is a growth mindset? According to Carol S. Dweck, a psychology professor at Stanford University, there are two kinds of mindsets: fixed and growth. People with a fixed tend to see themselves with fixed intelligence and capabilities, whereas people with a growth mindset believe that they can increase their intelligence and improve their capabilities through effort and determination. In the classroom and beyond, real learning occurs when students put forth the effort to break through barriers, accomplish difficult tasks, and learn from mistakes. ...
Like many other educators out there, I love my profession. I love creating engaging and challenging lessons. I love watching my students as they finally master a difficult concept. I even love my students (well, most of them). However, like many other educators out there, I also have my days. The days when I want to pull my hair out from frustration, cry until I have no tears left, and leave school and never return again. Those are the challenging days. Those are the days when it feels like I am constantly fighting a losing battle. And while those days are far and few in between, those are the days when I need this advice the most: save everything students give to you. Save all of the thank you letters. Save all of the silly drawings. Save all of the yearbook pictures. Save everything. Save everything in a file in the right-hand drawer of your desk. Save it there so that it is close by when you need it. Because even though deep down in the pits of our hearts we really do truly...