There are three things every teacher should do before taking their students to the computer lab to research information for their research papers: teach the difference between reliable and unreliable sources, check to make sure every student has a self-generated research question, and help prepare students with key phrases and words to search. Whenever I begin teaching the research paper , I always share with my students the story of how I wrote my Master's thesis paper. It was a 50 page paper with 50 different sources. I don't do this to toot my own horn. I don't do this to scare my students away from post-secondary education. I don't do this to make the students feel like their research assignment is petty and small. I do this so that I can explain the process of research to them and so that they know I was once in their shoes. So how exactly do you write a 50-page research paper that has 50 unique, credible sources? One source at a time. Try my Argument Re...
April is National Poetry Month, and this April is the 20th anniversary of National Poetry Month. Let’s celebrate poetry in our classrooms with some of these great ideas. 1. Create Acrostic Poem Posters in Class One of the best ways to decorate your classroom is with colorful student work. Middle school and high school students enjoy seeing their work on display. For this project, there are two kinds of acrostic posters students can create. Either assign or have students sign up for certain poetry terms or famous poets. Once students have their topics, instruct them to create a colorful acrostic poem poster that is informative and colorful. If you choose poetry terms as the topic, the poem must relate to the assigned term. If you decide to have students create posters about famous poets, their poems must relate to their assigned or chosen poet. 2. Request a FREE National Poetry Month Poster for your classroom Delivery takes 4-6 weeks, but you still might be able to req...
Growth Mindset Writing Prompts A big component of fostering a growth mindset in the classroom is regularly discussing grit and determination, learning from mistakes, and pushing through challenges. In addition to the Growth Mindset Bell Ringers  and  Growth Mindset Activities   that I use in my classroom, I will also have student develop a growth mindset through free writing and journaling. If you are looking for more growth mindset activities, check out the activities and resources at the end of this post. Try my Growth Mindset Bell-Ringers Sign up to receive a week of my Growth Mindset Bell-Ringers. Success! Now check your email to confirm your subscription. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again. Email Address I'd like to receive the free email course. Subscribe We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe ...
This is the second blog post in a series of posts about creating and establish a growth mindset in the classroom. Read the first post about creating a growth mindset here . I’ll admit it. I’ve made mistakes as an educator. Some of the biggest mistakes I’ve made include being too stubborn and too strict. Neither of these helped me practice a growth mindset in my classroom. As a new teacher, I was pretty stubborn. I did not accept late work. I did not allow test retakes. I did not provide students a needed opportunity to learn from their mistakes. Instead, I forced their mistake to be their end result. I wasn’t helping anyone. Luckily, this did not last long. As I gained more experience as an educator, I naturally adopted more of a growth mindset before I even knew it was a “thing” in education. The end result was magical. Student tried harder, learned more, and strived to make me see their own successes. Here are some simple things I do in the classroom to practice ...