After the end of a long and productive school year, I like to take some time to celebrate with my class. Throughout the year we’ve been through a lot. They tackled an entire curriculum, wrote countless essays, conducted research for a variety of research projects and papers, analyzed thousands and thousands of words, and did so all without complaining. Okay, so that last piece might be a stretch, but I won’t hold it against them. The end of the year is a time to celebrate my students and all of their accomplishments. The end of the year is a great time to reflect on what they’ve learned. This year I incorporated growth mindset activities and g rowth mindset bell ringers i nto my instruction, and reflection is a big proponent of that. I recently created and posted an End of the Year Growth Mindset resource that is ideal for wrapping up the school year as you and your students reflect on their successes and failures from the year. This end of the year resource includes three ...
Your bank wants you to go paperless. You child's report card is paperless. Retailers want to email you receipts rather than printing them at the register. Your students want to use their mobile devices for everything. So what about your classroom? How are managing your teaching lessons? Are you paper or tech? Blended or 1:1? For ideas and tips about going digital, check out my blog post on Creating a Digital Classroom . Whether you are all in for going paperless, you plan on it, or you just can't seem to head in the paperless direction, Earth Day is typically the time when we all think about our environment, energy, recycling, preserving our resources, and eliminating waste. That's where our English language arts blog link up comes in. Using technology in your classroom will definitely cut down on your trips to the copy machine. Sharing an assignment with your students via a cloud storage system (Google Drive or One Drive), an educational app (Notability, MS OneNote, ...
There’s nothing I love more than Google Forms. Okay, that’s not true. I love my husband, my children, and Bordeaux candies from See’s Chocolates way more more than I love Google Forms, but when it comes to generating authentic classroom discussion, Google Forms ranks supreme. I also love how using Google Forms in the classroom helps me save paper! One way I use Google Forms in my classroom is for class review. If my students have an important test or quiz coming up, I’ll create a Google Form with multiple-choice, review questions. I’ll instruct my students to quickly complete the class review form, which is essentially a quiz in itself. (One of the benefits of this activity is that I get to see the real value that this review has by comparing students’ review scores to their actual quiz scores). Completing the review question Google Form is not the review though. In fact, I prefer if students complete the form quickly and choose the answer that they first think is correct. The re...
Even though I incorporate poetry in my instruction throughout the year, whenever I teach my poetry unit, students always seem to moan and groan. It seems as if many students don’t like poetry, so I end my poetry unit with a fun poetry project that students love: Blackout Poetry. If your students have never encountered Blackout Poetry before, they will love this assignment. I incorporate this project with literature we’ve previously read in class. Since my poetry unit coincides with National Poetry Month (April), I find online PDF versions of the novels and short stories we’ve read in class and print those out. I print out several different pages from each novel so that my students have a variety of options from which to choose. Before they begin working on this project, I help them out by telling them to first skim the page. As they skim, I have them look for words that pop out at them. Once they have some words that they want to use, I then have them add in more words fro...