Congratulations, Teachers! Summer is upon us, and we’ve survived 180 days of craziness. Now what? If you’re anything like me, you cannot and will not sit around all summer. Sure, you say you will. And you certainly will try, but after about a week you might find yourself going a bit stir crazy. Here are three different productive activities you can enjoy right now! Reflect . How did your year go? What did you love? What could you do without? How would you like next year to go? Start journaling! Reflect on your experiences and brainstorm your upcoming school year. Bringing your ideas to life will substantially assist you when going back to school. I challenge you to keep an ongoing journal entry to think about what you want your classroom and curriculum to look like for the upcoming school year! Research . Changing your lesson plans is intimidating once you find your comfort zone. Use this time to broaden your horizon, hello Pinterest ! I have quite a few different boards for yo...
As more and more schools integrate technology into the classroom, the need for high-quality, effective EdTech sites increases. Last year I taught my first year in a 1:1 classroom; every student had access to a Chromebook. It was wonderful. Between using several of my SMARTePlans digital lessons for Google Drive and various EdTech sites, teaching in a 1:1 classroom significantly reduced the amount of paper I used in the classroom. However, teachers do not need to teach in a 1:1 classroom to use SMARTePlans resources or implement these EdTech sites into their classroom. In fact, I utilized the computer lab and assigned a few activities, including my Research Paper Writing Unit and my Character Analysis Interactive Notebook , and used a couple of these sites before transitioning to a 1:1 classroom. Whether you are teaching in a 1:1 classroom or if you are only able to get into the computer lab once in a while, here is my list of the top 5 EdTech sites for secondary English t...
Beginning a poetry unit can be intimidating for both teachers and students alike, but it does not have to be something to dread. Poetry offers so much freedom in the classroom: freedom for teachers to incorporate project-based learning into the classroom, and freedom for students to explore new avenues to express themselves. After I introduce poetry to my students with a quick annotation lesson that teaches them how to read and annotate poetry , I move onto fun and creative activities like blackout poetry , blank verse projects , and theme analysis projects. One project-based learning assignment that I love to incorporate in my poetry unit is a universal theme poetry analysis project. This project is a great end-of-unit-project assesses student understanding while giving students an opportunity to explore universal themes that interest them. One of the great things about this project is that it can easily be tailored to fit a wide variety of grade levels. Students in upper-el...