Teaching the Hero's Journey

Teaching the Hero's Journey in the Secondary ELA classroom.
One of my favorite lessons to teach in my short story unit is the Hero’s Journey. I enjoy teaching this lesson because I love seeing my students’ aha! moments - the moment when they get it, and they start making the connections between the content I am teaching and their favorite books and movies. Their faces light up, and faint chatter about Harry Potter, various Disney movies, and other stories slowly fills the room.

Teaching the Hero's Journey
To introduce the Hero’s Journey, I first teach this Prezi by Laura Randazzo. I adore this Prezi because she makes the content completely accessible for the students. It provides relatable examples that the students know, and it also includes videos that show key events throughout the Hero’s Journey cycle.


After teaching the Prezi, I then show the Ted Ed video “What Makes a Hero?” by Matthew Winkler. This video is spectacular for a couple reasons. First, I love how it presents the Hero’s Journey in relation to a clock and a cycle. This visual sticks with the students. I also like how this video relates the notion of the Hero’s Journey to students in their everyday lives.


Once we go over the Prezi and video, we then read a short story and track the protagonist’s journey as a hero. Together, we identify each element of the Hero’s Journey cycle as outlined in the video and then discuss the qualities that make the character a hero. This helps me gauge whether or not my students are ready for the Hero’s Journey project. I have a graphic organizer in my Sticky Note Literary Analysis Unit.


The Hero’s Journey poster project is one of my favorite projects of the year. Students form groups of 2-3 and select a movie or book that they feel is a quintessential representation of the Hero’s Journey. Together, they discuss the movie and create a poster that represents all of the elements of the Hero’s Journey. I provide my students with a tabloid size piece of paper (affiliate link) for the project so they have more space to create.

Teaching the Hero's Journey in the Secondary ELA classroom.

Teaching the Hero's Journey in the Secondary ELA classroom.

Teaching the Hero's Journey in the Secondary ELA classroom.
To conclude the assignment, I have students present their findings to the class so that they can practice their presentation and public speaking skills.


I usually give my students 2-3 days of class time to work in their groups.

This is the first of two blog posts that outlines how I teach the Hero’s Journey. The next post will be about short stories and poems that you can use in your classroom when teaching the Hero’s Journey.
Teaching the Hero's Journey in the Secondary ELA classroom.