An existing stigma still surrounds graphic novels in the eyes of students and educators alike. In actuality, educators can use graphic novels as an excellent tool for teaching visual literacy. Students will appreciate the change of pace as they read a story from a new and invigorating perspective. Graphic novels can provide a visual aid for students that struggle with comprehension and engaging with works of literature while also being enjoyed by intermediate and advanced readers. The following are four graphic novels to use in the classroom: 1. American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang This graphic novel combines the culture of contemporary America with that of ancient Chinese mythology. The story provokes a thoughtful analysis of how individuals interact with those around them. Students will appreciate the humor with which Yang writes, and teachers will be drawn to the relevance of the story’s political and cultural dilemmas. For additional reading regarding the experi...
My favorite teaching unit is my research and rhetorical analysis unit. I love providing my students with the knowledge and resources they need to critically read and analyze text, know why it is powerful, and understand how the author crafted it. I feel that truly understanding the language and the text, primarily through rhetorical analysis, is something that makes all of my students critical thinkers. Subscribe to my email list! Receive an editable copy of the PAPA Square Analysis Project in your inbox Success! Now check your email to confirm your subscription. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again. Email Address I'd like to receive the free email course. Subscribe You can unsubscribe at any time. Powered by ConvertKit When I first teach rhetorical analysis , I spend a couple of ...
Shakespeare is a staple in almost every English class. From Romeo and Juliet to Hamlet, students either love Shakespeare, or they hate him, whether it be the subject matter of the plays or the antiquated language. There are some ways, however, to get more reluctant students more interested in reading the Bard. 1. Interpreting the language “To be or not to be, the question that is, young padawan.”- Yoda Okay, so that’s not Yoda or the actual line from Hamlet. However, it is an exciting way for a student to learn and understand what’s being said by Hamlet. Have students interpret and scene or speech from Shakespeare’s play into modern language or the dialect of their choice. It’s a fun way for students to begin to understand what’s being said by the characters and insert a bit of their personality into the lessons. One of my favorite lessons for this activity is to have students work in partners and rewrite the Prologue in Romeo and Juliet in modern language. 2. Sonnets The sonnets...
Many times students seem to have a difficult time writing their thesis statements . It looks like it has nothing to do with the ideas presented in the paper, or can just be the students trying to take on too much. For middle school and high school teachers, it is important to teach thesis statements early, so students don’t struggle with them too much down the line. In college, students will be expected to write a poignant thesis statement without any instruction or help from the professor. There are a couple of ways to work on thesis statement writing with students, but these are my favorite three to talk about. 1. Have students look at their body paragraphs and follow the main idea through. The thesis statement is mostly a guiding statement of the paper’s main idea without stating the conclusion. Have students read over their papers, and have them write a sentence about what the entire paper is about. That means waiting for the final drafting process to create the intro, bu...
Students—and teachers, alike—are capable of making an array of writing mistakes.  While this can be due to a lack of proof-reading or a simple typo, many students make writing mistakes because they are unaware of the grammatical rules that are in place. Recognizing that a mistake has been made is usually the first step to solving it.  Here are three of the most common mistakes made by students today. 1. Comma Splices In general, comma splices are not tricky.  They occur when two complete sentences are fused together with a comma rather than the appropriate conjunction. For example: "I must go to the store, we need bread." The two parts divided by the comma are both independent clauses that should not be joined by a comma. Before fixing this error, students must understand what comma splices are as well as how to recognize an independent clause . A quick lesson on conjunctions and sentence structure will enable your students to identify when and how to join s...
I recently started teaching rhetorical analysis to my sophomores. This unit precedes our research paper , and so one of the goals of my rhetorical analysis unit is to help students become critical readers. I want my students to be able to read a complex text and know a few things within their first read: I want them to know if it is a credible source, I want them to know the author’s purpose, and I want them to begin thinking about why the text is effective. When I teach rhetorical analysis, I also teach the rhetorical précis. This four-sentence writing task is quite difficult for students, especially when they are so used to summarizing a text and its main points rather than how an author crafts his or her argument. Since this writing task is so complicated, I scaffold my instruction so that students gradually ease into writing their own précis. The first part of the scaffold is writing a class précis. It is a fun and engaging activity that takes about two 60-minute class...