Many students tend to be scared away from poetry. More often than not, students who believe that they either do not enjoy poetry or they don’t understand it dread the poetry unit in an English classroom. This is often due to improper teaching in previous classes. Students must learn how to take the appropriate approach to poetry while allowing themselves to enjoy and make personal connections with the piece. Here are five ways to make poetry fun and approachable in the classroom. 1. Taking the proper stance Readers should enjoy poetry. Students should not have to stress over proper interpretation while worrying about whether they understand it correctly. A poem should not be approached in the same way that students approach, say, a history textbook. Make sure your students know they are free to enjoy the poem without worrying about finding out the “true meaning.” Sign up for my poetry emails Subscribe to receive FREE poetry teaching resources! Thank you for subscribing....
Students may moan and groan when they are required to read one of the so-called “boring classics.” They wonder why they need to read something that may have been written over 100 years ago. While contemporary literature can hold a great amount of value for students in the classroom, classic literature should not be forgotten. Here are four reasons you should continue to teach the classics in your English classroom. 1. Historical Context and Connections Classic works of literature provide an insight into a different time. Books such as these can help your students make connections between the plot of the book and the time in which it was written. This can improve analysis and understanding. Even futuristic novels, such as Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, can give insight into the author’s perspective on his own time. 2. Improve Vocabulary Students often don’t enjoy classic literature because of the dated language. However, this dated language can improve vocabulary skills in students. ...
Parents commonly read to their young children, and teachers of early grade-levels read to their students as well, but teachers seem to drop the practice of reading aloud to their students as they get older. However, being read to can be a beneficial practice for middle and high school students alike. Here are five reasons you should read aloud to your students. 1. Engaging Listeners Minds can easily wander, but reading aloud to your class creates an auditory level of sensory perception that can help students engage with the subject-matter. Students will all hear the same material at the same time. No student will be behind or ahead. Additionally, many standardized tests contain listening activities, so reading aloud to your middle school and high school students help prepare them for the test without directly engaging in test-prep activities. Join my email list! Subscribe to receive updates from The Daring English Teacher. Thank you for subscribing! You will soon...
Grammar rules can often be hard to remember and follow. A simple grammar lesson can often become frustrating for students as they struggle to comprehend what they are doing wrong. It is sometimes also difficult for them to recognize how to fix their mistakes. However, students often struggle with the same writing problems over and over again. In an earlier post, I wrote about three common mistakes students include in their writing. Here are three more common mistakes and how to help students correct them. 1. Commas Commas seem to be one of the hardest things for students to use. They either use too little, or they use too many. Examples of typical incorrect comma usage include comma splices and the lack of a comma after an introductory clause. For example: “Because we had a flat tire we were late to the party.” A comma should follow the word tire, but students often neglect the use of a comma in a sentence like the one above. A quick way to remind students when to use c...
“In like a lion, out like a lamb.” This saying has frequently been used to describe the month of March as harsh winter conditions give way to spring. While the proverb categorizes the month’s climate, it also sets the scene for two exciting poems to be used in the classroom: William Blake’s “The Lamb” and “The Tyger.” Here are five reasons students should read “The Lamb” and “The Tyger” in March. 1. An Introduction to William Blake As two of his most famous poems, “The Lamb” and “The Tyger” can act as excellent tools to introduce students to one of Britain’s most iconic poets. Students will familiarize themselves with Blake’s writing style and learn to recognize some of his techniques. 2. Corresponding Poems William Blake is famous for writing two books of poetry: Song of Innocence and Songs of Experience. The two compilations of poetry are intended to show contrasting views of the human condition. “The Lamb” is from Songs of Innocence while “The Tyger” hails from Songs of Ex...