School is relatively short when you think about the way we slice the day into different periods. Kids get maybe an hour with you a day, and that’s it. And once you factor in the first and last three minutes of class, we just lose more time. However, even though it feels as if we are strapped for time, spending some of this time in the classroom reading will only be beneficial for your students, even if it is a short while. They go home, do the homework you assigned, and then forget about English as they work on the rest of their tasks and take care of their outside responsibilities. But that might be the best reason to have them read during class. Here are four reasons students should read during class 1. They might not do it on their own time. Students these days are so overloaded with extra-curricular activities and responsibilities outside of school that they may not find the time to do the reading you assign for the next class period. By providing them with some time in c...
Oftentimes, students will not edit their own work, as it does not seem necessary to them. What they may not realize is the importance of self-editing, especially when it means their writing will improve, and maybe even more important to them, their grades will improve. Teaching them to edit their own writing is one of the most important skills you can teach them. Here are seven ways to teach them this important skill: 1. Give students a list of commonly mistaken mechanics. Sometimes students won’t edit a paper because they do not know what is wrong with it, and do not know where to start. Actually giving them the tools to see what they may have done wrong will give them the chance to correct it, with the added assurance that everyone makes mistakes like this too. Join my email list! Subscribe to receive updates from The Daring English Teacher.         Please sign me up Subscribe   You will not receive spam, and you can unsubscribe at any time.  Powered by Conver...
A great way to incorporate a growth mindset into the middle school and high school ELA classroom is by introducing it through literature. As we read and teach novels in our classroom, discussing how characters persevere to overcome substantial obstacles can have more of an impact on our students’ lives than we imagine. It is important to have your students read books that tell stories of growing up. High schoolers are especially focused on trying to find themselves and who they are. By reading texts that tell the stories of characters who have a growth mindset, students will feel like perhaps they are not that different either. Your students finding who they are, and feeling like they belong is a valuable lesson easily learned through these kinds of novels. Here are 9 different novels, both classics and young adult fiction, with a significant growth mindset that your students will love to read: 1. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston In this novel, the reader wa...
One of the most challenging things for a (new) teacher is planning and pacing the curriculum. After all, there are so many different standards to teach, practice, and assess, and so little time. Whether you teach middle school ELA or high school English at a school where you have a strict pacing guide or if you teach at a school where you have complete freedom in your planning, this is tough. I’ve taught in both situations, and each one has its positives and negatives. Regardless of how your school is structured, every teacher in every single classroom needs to plan lessons, activities, and assessments, and figure out how much time to spend on each one. Getting the timing of it down takes a few years, and pacing and planning is something that changes with every school year. To help out teachers, I am sharing my secondary ELA pacing and planning guide with you. This pacing guide comes as a PDF download that also includes a link to an editable Google Doc. If you want to make ...