One of my favorite units to teach is rhetorical analysis because I love incorporating robust, relevant, and timely texts into my classroom, especially when timely speeches perfectly coincide with classical literature we are reading. When teaching rhetorical analysis, one of the most important things to keep in mind is not what the author or speaker says, but how the author or speaker says it and why it is so effective. Once you get beyond the main ideas and supporting details and really ask your students to look at, consider, analyze, and evaluate the effectiveness of what the author or speaker does, then you are genuinely analyzing a text for its rhetorical merit. Join my email list! Subscribe to receive updates from The Daring English Teacher. Thank you for subscribing! You will soon receive updates, freebies, and teaching ideas. There was an error submitting your subscription. Please try again. Email Address ...
Socratic seminars are great learning tools because they allow students to voice their own questions and opinions about the subject being discussed. But with the size of classrooms constantly increasing, they can also be problematic. It becomes problematic when a few students take over the conversation. Without a teacher regulating the discussion, some students can feel left out and unable to communicate their thoughts. But that defeats the purpose of a Socratic seminar. The benefit of a Socratic seminar is that it is entirely regulated by the students. You get to sit and listen, maybe offering a comment now and then, but otherwise, the time entirely revolves around the students having an open discussion about the subject matter. Join my email list! Subscribe to receive updates from The Daring English Teacher. Thank you for subscribing! You will soon receive updates, freebies, and teaching ideas. There was an error submitting your subscr...