Short stories are an essential part of teaching students literature. It is good for students to understand that there is more to literature than merely novels and poetry. Short stories can also be great ways to explain similar concepts to that of novels, in a shorter amount of time, with perhaps even more examples involved. Here are five different ways to analyze short stories within your classroom: 1. Pay close attention to the details Details are always abundant in novels, but with a short story, every aspect has a reason for being in the story. Since word count is low, students should pick up on the different information and why each detail is important. Point out the various important details and have your students expand on the importance of each. Maybe you could share the stories of George Saunders or Flannery O’Connor to teach how the difference is in the details for short stories. Suitable examples include “Puppy” by Saunders and “A Good Man is Hard to Find” by O’Co...
Dating violence, mental illness, and rape culture are increasingly common in today’s society, especially in adolescents. In fact, according to the CDC, a recent national study, “In a recent national survey, nearly 10 percent of high school students reported physical violence and 11 percent reported that they experienced sexual violence from a dating partner in the 12 months before the survey.” Even though dating violence, mental illness, and rape culture are issues our students must face, these topics are either mishandled or not even discussed in schools at the secondary level. Sure, we read To Kill a Mockingbird and discuss Mayella Ewell. But do we really discuss this with our students and make sure that they are okay, that they know what is right, and that they know when and how to speak up and ask for help? This post contains affiliate links. As English teachers, we have the ability to approach pressing topics through the literature we teach. And as English teachers, we sho...