Reading is essential to becoming successful in life. While some of your students may love reading and jump at the chance to read anything and everything, others are less enthused and will want to find ways around reading in your class. Here are ten different ways to get your students excited about reading in your classroom and beyond. 1. Find books that will be interesting for your students. Sometimes the most straightforward step is to bring books that are unfamiliar to your students but are in the genre of something they may love. Graphic novels or young adult fiction are usually great ways to get your students interested enough to read. Graphic novels will appear to be more comfortable for your students, but there are graphic novels that can be educational and fulfill the literary need for your classroom. Young adult novels are great for the high school classroom because if students are readers, they will most likely be reading books of this sort already. Young adult novels ...
Over the summer, I set out to make improvements to my classroom library. I wanted to find appealing books from diverse authors that my students would want to read. And while I was able to purchase quite a few books at a low price (check garage sales, thrift stores, and used bookstores), I still needed a way to organize my new library. This post contains affiliate links. While they have no direct impact on you, I may receive a small kickback to help me run this site. I decided to organize my library by genre because I felt that by doing so, my students would be able to easily and quickly find books that appealed to their interests. After deciding to organize my high school English classroom library by genre, I searched for labels that I could use to label because they square design would cover most book spines and because they have many different colors. I chose THESE LABELS to use for my classroom library. Once my labels came in, I downloaded the Word template that was ...
Incorporating drama is an enriching way to analyze text in your English classes. Sometimes it can be difficult for students to get a full grasp on plays, but once they realize that these works of literature are meant to be performed on stage in front of the audience, students start to see them in new ways. Plays are very common to study, yet there can be stumbling blocks in the full analyzation of them. Here are seven different ways to teach your students how to analyze plays in the classroom and elsewhere: Perform the plays in class This may be the approach most classes take in studying plays, but this is because performing the play, or even small scenes from they play, really helps students gain a better understanding. Simply reading the lines out loud and finding the different characters’ emotions as they act, will ultimately help students understand exactly what the story is about and what they should learn from it. It can also be a lot of fun for students to engage in this wa...
With final exam season right around the corner, many teachers are thinking about what they plan to do. While some schools might be a little more relaxed and allow teachers to throw end-of-the-semester parties on the final day of the semester, other schools are a bit more strict and have specific policies as to what teachers can and cannot do in the classroom on the designated final exam days. Here is a list of different types of academic and rigorous final exam options you can use in your middle school or high school English classroom. Traditional Exam The traditional exam is the tried and true final exam. Whether it is a cumulative test or a test on your most recent unit, one option you have for administering your final exam is to give a traditional test. To help save time and make grading easier during the end of the semester, you can opt for a multiple-choice, matching, and true/false test that you can easily and quickly grade with a scantron machine. My 100 question ELA test...
Whether you are planning for the New Year or thinking about how to best roll with New Year’s momentum, the new calendar year provides teachers with so many enriching opportunities to connect with and engage with students. During this time of year, positive messages and promises of what the New Year may hold bombard our students, and many of our students are thinking about how to make this year better than the last. During this time, I like to take advantage of this optimism and have my students focus on goal-setting, growth mindset, and reflection. Here are 5 activities for the New Year: 1. Letter to Self Have your students write a letter to themselves. Instruct your students to write about where they are in life and about their goals, hopes, and dreams. In the letter, ask your students to formulate a plan and write down actionable items they can accomplish in the new calendar year that will help them achieve their long-term goals. Also, have them write about why this is impo...