Giving your students a short writing assignment at the beginning of the year is a terrific way to not only access your students’ abilities but also to ease summer-weary teens back into the demands of high school. But before you face a roomful of eyerolls by assigning yet another essay on what everyone did over summer break, here are a few unique writing exercises from Write Screenplays That Sell: The Ackerman Way , by Hal Ackerman. Although the majority of the exercises found in Ackerman’s book are specific to screenwriting, the most interesting ones are quite general. Not only are creative writing exercises a fun way to mix up your students’ assignments but they will also provide you with a unique insight into your students’ imaginations, their likes, their dislikes, and their writing instincts. 1. Verb Replacement In this exercise, Ackerman tells his readers to take the last scene they wrote (or for the English classroom, the last paragraph or so), find the first ten ver...
With a new school year upon us, it’s time to re-energize your teaching practices with some new routines and resources. Here are ten teaching resources and strategies to implement in your classroom this year. Bell Ringers I use the first five to ten minutes of every class period for a do-now, or bell-ringer, activity. The students come into my room, see what the do-now is, and begin working. This provides me with valuable time to take and enter attendance, answer student questions, and check on individual students. I use this free bell-ringer recording sheet and stamp every student’s page every day. This provides me with a chance to have some facetime with every student, even if just for a moment. 1. Sentence Combining Bell-Ringers These bell-ringers are great because they help students improve their writing. I project a slide up on the board, and the students read the cluster of individual sentences and combine them into one grammatically correct, complex sentence. To help sho...
Let's face it, not every one of our students is going to love English class as much as we did. All our students have different learning styles and interests, and what we pick to teach will not always pique their interest. However, choosing a wide variety of works may be a way to ensure that all your students will get to read at least one work they enjoy. Here are a few book recommendations that hit different categories while still staying in the realm of literature. This post contains affiliate links. 1. Dracula by Bram Stoker You probably weren't expecting the first recommendation to be a classic 19th-century novel, but Dracula is jammed pack with action, suspense, and mystery that will be sure to entice any reader. The novel is like a roller coaster starting with ever-increasing mystery until it reaches the top with the horror revealing the famous Count Dracula only to race back down into the mystery. Students will have no choice but to continue reading to find out w...
It’s that time of the year. Time to pack up your flip-flops, set your alarms once again, and bid a fond farewell to our old friend “summer vacation.” It’s no secret students (and teachers) can have a difficult time transitioning back to a school mindset. However, there is no better way to reactivate those dormant literary analysis skills than with some poems to ring in the new school year! Because poems are shorter than most literary texts or excerpts while still packed full of meaning, reading them in class or for a small homework assignment can help your students dip a figurative toe into the waters of analysis. Here are 10 poems sure to pique the interest of even the most reluctant back-to-schooler: Summer Shower by Emily Dickinson Ah, summer is always gone too soon! Indulge and hold onto it a little longer as Dickinson uses her whimsical imagery to transport you into the whirlwind of delight that comes with dancing through the summer rain. Talk with your students about the s...