Teaching in the second quarter and toward the end of the first semester can be a bit tough. The novelty of the new school year has worn off, October is long, and winter break is just a bit too far away still. However, there are quite a few positives that the second quarter of the school year brings. For one, your students know all of your classroom routines, and your body has completely adjusted to school time. Here’s a look at ten classroom lessons and activities that I like to teach and include in my classroom in the second quarter of the school year. Argument Writing - Students love a good argument essay prompt, and this unit includes all of the materials that you’ll need to teach your students about argumentative essay writing. It includes student writing resources and an editable PowerPoint presentation for direct instruction. Writing in the Third Person - If you are anything like me right about now, you’ve assigned your students their first essay and quickly r...
This is a sponsored post by Listenwise.com. If you haven’t checked out Listenwise.com yet, you and your students are missing out on some fantastic listening-based lessons and activities in the middle school and high school classroom. As a high school English teacher at a public school that participates in annual state standardized tests, I definitely feel the pressure to adequately prepare my students so that they do their best on the test. Not only do state tests contribute to school funding, indexing, and ranking, but in California, a junior’s score on the state test gets printed on their transcript and can affect Cal State college admissions. The stakes are pretty high. There are quite a few ways that I help prepare my students for state testing, and one of them is by focusing on the lowest scoring testing strand: listening. Currently, 22 states have a listening component on their state tests, and not just in California, but throughout the entire nation, students score the ...
If there’s one thing that students of all ages love and find joy in, it’s music. Thanks to technology, streaming services make all kinds of music available to anyone with a smartphone or a laptop. Mixing and matching favorite tracks and creating playlists is a rite of passage to tweens and teens; a marker of their ability to decide what they like and dislike for themselves. So why not incorporate that into your curriculum? Incorporating music into selected reading units can transform and channel that strong sense of individuality and autonomy into excitement for literature and developing critical thinking skills. The key? Playlists, Playlists, Playlists! You’ve probably heard your students discussing their playlists, whether they’re talking about the songs they love, exchanging customized collections as gifts, or ribbing each other about their respective musical guilty pleasures. Siphon that passionate energy and self-driven creativity into classroom assignments using that v...