Shakespeare has been gone for 400 years and yet we still insist on keeping him in our classroom. Mention Shakespeare, and I can guarantee teens immediately put up a front. Breaking through that initial abrasiveness can sometimes become a hurdle - but pointing out Shakespeare’s relevancy is a great start to a study. Below are some quick thoughts you might consider sharing with students, as well as several resources you can use while teaching Shakespeare. Shakespeare influenced our language. You can find so many references in our English language directly from Shakespeare’s work. If your students have ever been tongue-tied or hoodwinked, they’re quoting Shakespeare. There is a definitive record of Shakespeare being identified as the sole user or the first user of many common words and phrases. Your students might enjoy focusing on phrases they do recognize instead of worrying about what seems confusing. Shakespeare's themes are timeless. If you cut the language that feels outdated to...
As the world of education advances into the digital era, teachers need high-quality, content-rich, digital, interactive lessons and educational materials that can be delivered over the Internet. That is why I created SMART e Plans. SMART e Plans are English language arts lessons and activities designed for teachers who want to implement digital learning into their classrooms. These electronic lesson plans are engaging, rigorous, and fully-integrable into a Google classroom. To get a free, first-hand look at what a SMART e Plans resource looks like, download my free, digital reading log available on my TeachersPayTeachers store. Click HERE for the resource. Students can use this resource to track their weekly reading throughout the entire school year. Students simply copy and paste new Google slides into their very own document on Google Drive and type in a summary of the pages they've read and a memorable quote. I like having students keep track of quotes as they read...