For many students, learning new words can be one of the greatest joys or greatest dreads alike. For a few of our students, there is nothing more exhilarating than coming across a mysterious new word in a book, leaning its meaning, and, proudly showing off the newly-acquired treasure to friends and family. However, for countless others, new words aren't all that exciting. And for many of our students, new, confusing, and intimidating words are roadblocks. Alas, this is not how it's meant to be! Here are five activities that will engage students creatively with their vocabulary words and ensure that they permanently "stick" in students' minds: 1. Media Meetup This weekly activity works best in partnerships or groups of three. At the beginning of each week, have students, in their pairs/groups, split up the vocabulary list amongst themselves, so that each student is responsible for an equal number of words. The students must then find examples of the words p...
One of the fundamental building blocks of learning is vocabulary. Having a well-rounded and robust vocabulary plays a critical role in students' learning, communication skills, language development, and comprehension. Whenever I plan a new unit, whether it be a literature-based unit or a skills-based unit, I always include vocabulary words to accompany my instruction. When I use Vocabulary.com , I can easily find an existing list that matches my instruction. If such a list doesn't exist, I can modify a current list to meet my specific instructional needs or build my own list. Here is a list of five critical reasons for why teachers should intentionally include vocabulary in every unit. Improves Language Development and Acquisition When students work on improving their vocabulary regularly, they build a stronger vocabulary base. This strong vocabulary base helps improve literacy rates and help students be more successful academically. It is important to include academi...