If you aren’t using Google Forms in your classroom yet, you and your students are missing out on the limitless possibilities Google Forms offers. Here are 10 ways that I like to utilize Google Forms in my classroom. 1. Collect Data Google Forms is a data-collection application. It is designed to collect data and transpose that information neatly into a Google Sheet. Anytime you need to collect some information from your students, fellow colleagues, or parents, Google Forms is the way to go. 2. Pre Assessment Tool I started using Google Forms in my classroom last year as a pre-assessment tool. I would have students log into their Google Classroom accounts and take a quick 10-minute pretest. As teachers, we have so much work to grade already, and Google Forms eases that load. Plus, it provides teachers with instant access to data. TEACHING TIP: Once the students were finished taking the test, I projected a summary of the responses on the board and went over the answers. ...
Out of all of the different resources available to teachers in the Google Apps for Education platform, Google Forms is, in my opinion, one of the most valuable resources. Ever since I started using Google Forms in my own classroom earlier this year, I am hooked. There are so many different ways to use Google Forms in the classroom. The possibilities are endless. What is a Google Form? A Google Form is an app in the Google suite that allows users to quickly collect data from people. Using Google Forms is ideal for surveys, questionnaires, and pre assessments. Like Google Docs and Slides, you can easily share and collaborate on Forms. Getting Started with Google Forms Getting started with Google Forms is simple and easy. To create a new Google Form, go into your Google Drive and select “New” and then “Google Forms.” You may need to select the “More” option to provide you with additional resources. One of the first things I suggest you do when creating a Google Form...
When I first started using Google in the classroom back in, I don’t even know when, I had absolutely no idea about just how helpful the Google platform would be for teaching. From Google Classroom to Google Docs and everything between, the Google Suite definitely helps me stay organized as a teacher. Here’s a look at how I use Google in the classroom and as a teacher. Using Google Docs in the Classroom Google Docs for Digital Collaboration I love using Google Docs for collaborative activities in the classroom. With my journalism students, since we are 100 percent remote right now, we use a collaborative Google Doc for our monthly story brainstorming. Also, when I am conducting digital collaborative activities such as the collaborative rhetorical precis activity, we use a carefully-created Google Doc with tables for whole-class participation. You can read my recent digital collaboration blog post on the Secondary English Coffeeshop to learn more about how I use Google Docs for digita...
There’s nothing I love more than Google Forms. Okay, that’s not true. I love my husband, my children, and Bordeaux candies from See’s Chocolates way more more than I love Google Forms, but when it comes to generating authentic classroom discussion, Google Forms ranks supreme. I also love how using Google Forms in the classroom helps me save paper! One way I use Google Forms in my classroom is for class review. If my students have an important test or quiz coming up, I’ll create a Google Form with multiple-choice, review questions. I’ll instruct my students to quickly complete the class review form, which is essentially a quiz in itself. (One of the benefits of this activity is that I get to see the real value that this review has by comparing students’ review scores to their actual quiz scores). Completing the review question Google Form is not the review though. In fact, I prefer if students complete the form quickly and choose the answer that they first think is correct. The re...
One of my favorite ways to deliver content to my students digitally (and also to save paper) is to use Google Forms in the classroom. If you haven’t used Forms before, or if you are new to using Google Forms, this blog post is for you! Google Forms is a survey-like app included in the Google suite, and it works beautifully well with Google Classroom. If you’re interested in the many ways you can use Google Forms in the classroom, you can read my previous post: 10 Ways to Use Google Forms in the Classroom . To start using Google Forms, you’ll want to open up a Google Form . To start, you’ll have your choice of starting a new form from scratch, or you can choose a template. I usually start one from scratch because it is easier for me. However, I also like to format my Works Cited pages manually… so, yeah. However, if you do choose to use a template, the Google Forms Template Gallery has an education category. Once you are in a new Google Form, you will want to set it up so tha...
This is the second post in a series of blog posts about using Google Forms in your classroom. Visit HERE to see the first post. Ever since I started using Google Forms in the classroom, I keep thinking about more ways to incorporate the forms and the data into my instruction. Using the data validation tool embedded in Google Forms, I’ve discovered how to force students to submit the type of work I expect. This tool allows me to digitally demand excellence from my students. One of the most common phrases I hear in my classes is, “Do we have to answer in complete sentences?” You would think that students know the answer for this question, especially in their English class, is yes, but that isn’t always the case. When students work in a Google Form I’ve created, I am able to set data validation to make sure that my students are not only answering in complete sentences, but that they are also restating the questions in their answers. By setting the data validation, I am making sure ...
As 2016 comes to an end and 2017 rolls in, it is time to start thinking about ways to improve our educational practices. We spend the first semester really getting to know our new students and understanding the different classroom dynamics of each class period, so it only makes sense to take what we know and improve our teaching practices. Here are 4 resolutions to incorporate in the new calendar year. One thing I want to focus on this year is providing my students with meaningful feedback that will enhance their learning. Sure, I can quickly jot down a checkmark next to a well-written sentence , but how does that really help my students? To provide my students with more meaningful and effective feedback, I’m going to write about two detailed comments on major papers that point out specifically what the students did well and why it works. Instead of writing “nice intro” on an essay, I might write, “great job on your thesis statement. It is detailed, to the point...
Like teaching remotely, ending the school year while teaching remotely is anything but ideal. We miss our students and our classroom communities we’ve built. And even more upsetting is the lack of closure students, and teachers will have this year. When schools shut down in mid-March, we had no idea it would be for the entire school year. However, one of the best things we can do for our students and ourselves right now is to stay positive for our students. Here is a list of ten different end-of-the-year activities that you can do remotely with your students. Collaborative Google Slide Project With a collaborative Google Slide project, you would assign each student one Google Slide to create. Students could fill their Slide with pictures, favorite quotes from the year’s readings, what they learned from the class, or their favorite memories from the school year. The options are endless! Once everyone submits their completed Google Slide, and you compile them into one present...